Xenophilia (True Strange Stuff)

The blog of Xeno, a slightly mad scientist

Improve Sleep and Mood with Light

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Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow? Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen?

During the day, computer screens look good—they’re designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn’t be looking at the sun.

[If you are willing to jailbreak your iPhone or iPad…] f.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer’s display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day.
It’s even possible that you’re staying up too late because of your computer. You could use f.lux because it makes you sleep better, or you could just use it just because it makes your computer look better.
http://justgetflux.com/

I installed this on New Year’s Day 2014 for my studio computer ( Windows 7 Pro) and so far I love it. I can still work on music up to bedtime but it feels like night time…especially when I also dim the lights in the house.

For those who do not want to jailbreak, in other words, if you want to keep Apple’s protections and restrictions, there is a night time browser called “Blue Light 0 Browser” in the App Store. When you start it, it turns your iPhone’s overall brightness to the lowest level–even after you quit the app–and also reduces the amount of blue light from that app while browsing the web with it.

Better yet, for improved mood and sleep, put on your blue light filtering goggles when the sun sets.

Since it is predominantly the blue wavelength that is most affective in melatonin suppression, it stands to reason that blocking this wavelength of light should be enough to significantly reduce, or even eliminate the melatonin-suppressing effects of nighttime light exposure. (19) In fact, blocking blue light has been shown in several studies to be extremely effective in reducing the melatonin-suppressing effects of intense and/or blue light. (20, 21)

There are a few possible solutions for reducing your exposure to blue light at night. One that is commonly used in the ancestral health community is a program called f.lux, a program that makes the color of your computer’s display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day. This program can be installed on computers, iPads, and iPhones, and may have a significant effect on your melatonin secretion when using these devices at night. The best part about this program is that it turns on automatically in response to the daylight in your particular time zone, so there’s no need to remember any adjustments to the screen.

A better option, in my opinion, is to use amber-lensed goggles once the sun has gone down. These blue-blocking lenses are highly effective in reducing the effects of blue light exposure, and in most cases completely eliminate the short-wavelength radiation necessary for nocturnal melatonin suppression. (22, 23, 24) These goggles have been shown to improve sleep quality as well as mood, simply by blocking blue light and simulating physiologic darkness.

The main reason I recommend using these goggles is because normal room light alone is enough to suppress melatonin at night, and unless you’re shutting off all the lights in your house when the sun sets, you’re still at risk for disrupting your melatonin-driven circadian rhythms. (25) While f.lux is a useful tool for your backlit devices, it’s nearly impossible to address all sources of melatonin-suppressing light in today’s world of modern technology and late-night work and entertainment habits. Amber-colored goggles are one of the only tools available to completely eliminate all blue light exposure at night, without ‘going off the grid’ and powering down your entire house after 7 PM.

There are two excellent (and cheap!) options for amber-lensed goggles on Amazon.com. The cheapest and most popular option is the Uvex brand, but if you wear eyeglasses you’ll need to get a wraparound pair like the Solar Shield brand. I’ve had many patients swear by these goggles, and if you can get over the dorkiness factor, you may find they make a big difference in your sleep quality, and perhaps even your general health and well being as well!

http://chriskresser.com/how-artificial-light-is-wrecking-your-sleep-and-what-to-do-about-it

2 comments on “Improve Sleep and Mood with Light

  1. dogsounds
    January 2, 2014

    Woah. Eerie syncronocity. I had never heard of f.lux until earlier today when I happened to be listening to a Tested podcast, **FROM 2010** and Gary Whitta mentioned it, so I checked it out and installed it a few hours ago. Now I come on here and you have posted about it. WTF?

    I love these kind of coincidences ^_^

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This entry was posted on January 1, 2014 by in Health.
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