Xenophilia (True Strange Stuff)

Blog of the real Xenophilius Lovegood, a slightly mad scientist

Archive for the ‘War’ Category

A map of human problems

Posted by Anonymous on June 21, 2014

20140621-135253-49973427.jpgI want something I can’t find on the net, something big and important. I want a visual interactive map of human problems and where we are along the various paths to solutions. I want everyone to be able to interact with it, add to it, vote on it!

We have all this information, so organize it! Who can help? Google? I want a globe where the continents are categories.

Here is a great planet maker: http://planetmaker.wthr.us/# I’d like something like terrestrial planet X.0 with randomly generated continents like this:
http://www-cs-students.stanford.edu/~amitp/game-programming/polygon-map-generation/demo.html

I want to zoom in on a problem to see the bleeding edge technology with details explained so anyone could understand it.

Update:

“At this year’s CeBIT exhibition, the team from Fraunhofer IGD / Fraunhofer IDM@NTU, Singapore, presents a new, exciting, X3DOM-based prototype for fast, intuitive exploration of information, which is entitled InfoLand. Information is presented on a multi-touch interface through a graphical representation, serving as an information or marketing tool for industry partners and collaborators, researchers, and students. Information is presented in the form of text, images, videos and 3D models, which can be accessed intuitively.”

Sounds like the InfoLand engine is close to being capable of what I’m imagining, but it doesn’t seem to be available for anyone to use.  What are the big categories?

Here’s a nice model as a start, but replace the Earth continents with the human problem continents, let them take different shapes as people add content and as old ideas erode.

http://workshop.chromeexperiments.com/projects/armsglobe/

Posted in Alt Energy, Do stuff, Earth, Education, Health, human rights, Money, Physics, Survival, Technology, War | 5 Comments »

North and South Korea Ready for War

Posted by Anonymous on April 1, 2014

It only takes a few brain damaged fools to destroy us. Aim carefully… at your own self-hatred, or whatever twists your humanity to allow you to murder a relative. Explode, with your demonic brown doughnuts, whatever keeps you from having compassion. Worst use of a good beach.

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Posted in War | Leave a Comment »

Abandoning the people of Afghanistan?

Posted by Anonymous on March 14, 2014

20140313-184207.jpgMarine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford’s remarks to the Senate Armed Services Committee appeared intended to shape the White House’s deliberation over whether to leave behind a contingent for training and counterterrorism missions beyond 2014 or pull out entirely. …

The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan said Wednesday that al-Qaeda’s network in that country is in “survival mode,” but warned that a full American military drawdown after the end of the year would allow the terrorist group to regenerate there.
Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford’s remarks to the Senate Armed Services Committee appeared intended to shape the White House’s deliberation over whether to leave behind a contingent for training and counterterrorism missions beyond 2014 or pull out entirely. The decision has been delayed by the Afghan president’s refusal to sign a security pact with Washington.
“A withdrawal, in my mind, means abandoning the people of Afghanistan, abandoning the endeavor that we’ve been here on for the last decade, and then providing al-Qaeda the space within which to begin again to plan and conduct operations against the West,” Dunford said.

http://m.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/us-commander-in-afghanistan-warns-that-full-withdrawal-will-allow-al-qaeda-to-regroup/2014/03/12/4f7f6288-aa20-11e3-8599-ce7295b6851c_story.html

What makes Afghanistan a place terrorists can plan to attack the USA? What have we really done there in the last ten years?

Posted in War | Leave a Comment »

Canada to pull out of Afghanistan

Posted by Anonymous on March 12, 2014

20140312-143051.jpgCanada’s military efforts in Afghanistan will end this month, with the withdrawal of the last 100 soldiers from Kabul, where they had been wrapping up training of Afghan National Security Forces.
Canada’s involvement included efforts in diplomacy, education, women’s rights and even dam building. The five years of heavy combat cost the lives of 158 Canadian soldiers, two consultants, one diplomat and one journalist.
With security deteriorating in many rural areas of Afghanistan, a number of foreigners have faced tighter security measures. As the country approaches the presidential elections next month, authorities expect to see more violence and instability. …

Against a backdrop of heightened security, the Canadian flag will be formally lowered on Wednesday and Canadian troops will leave Afghanistan by the end of the week.
Here’s a timeline of Canada’s role in Afghanistan:
October 2001: Following the 9-11 attacks in the United States, the UN Security Council adopts a resolution supporting efforts to root out terrorism in Afghanistan. On Oct. 8, a day after the U.S. begins operations against al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan, Canada announces that it will contribute sea, land and air forces to the operation.

Read more: http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/timeline-involved-since-2001-canada-wraps-up-its-mission-in-afghanistan-1.1724890#ixzz2vmPapqX1

Will this change anything with regard to the drugs coming from the area?

Afghanistan has been the greatest illicit opium producer in the entire world, ahead of Burma (Myanmar), the “Golden Triangle”, and Latin America since 1992, excluding the year 2001. Afghanistan is the main producer of opium in the “Golden Crescent”. Opium production in Afghanistan has been on the rise since U.S. occupation started in 2001. Based on UNODC data, there has been more opium poppy cultivation in each of the past four growing seasons (2004–2007) than in any one year during Taliban rule. Also, more land is now used for opium in Afghanistan than for coca cultivation in Latin America. In 2007, 92% of the non-pharmaceutical-grade opiates on the world market originated in Afghanistan. This amounts to an export value of about $4 billion, with a quarter being earned by opium farmers and the rest going to district officials, insurgents, warlords, and drug traffickers. In the seven years (1994–2000) prior to a Taliban opium ban, the Afghan farmers’ share of gross income from opium was divided among 200,000 families. In addition to opiates, Afghanistan is also the largest producer of cannabis (mostly as hashish) in the world.
Via Wikipedia

Posted in Money, Politics, War | Leave a Comment »

Plans to Destroy the Earth’s Protective Radiation Belts

Posted by Anonymous on March 4, 2014

nukeinspacestarfishprimeSince we’re coming up on the Fourth of July, and towns everywhere are preparing their better-than-ever fireworks spectaculars, we would like to offer this humbling bit of history. Back in the summer of 1962, the U.S. blew up a hydrogen bomb in outer space, some 250 miles above the Pacific Ocean. It was a weapons test, but one that created a man-made light show that has never been equaled — and hopefully never will. …

Some of the images in this video were until recently top secret. Peter Kuran of Visual Concept Entertainment collected them for his documentary Nukes In Space.

If you are wondering why anybody would deliberately detonate an H-bomb in space, the answer comes from a conversation we had with science historian James Fleming of Colby College.

“Well, I think a good entry point to the story is May 1, 1958, when James Van Allen, the space scientist, stands in front of the National Academy in Washington, D.C., and announces that they’ve just discovered something new about the planet,” he told us.

Van Allen described how the Earth is surrounded by belts of high-energy particles — mainly protons and electrons — that are held in place by the magnetic fields.

Today these radiation belts are called Van Allen belts. Now comes the surprise: While looking through the Van Allen papers at the University of Iowa to prepare a Van Allen biography, Fleming discovered “that [the] very same day after the press conference, [Van Allen] agreed with the military to get involved with a project to set off atomic bombs in the magnetosphere to see if they could disrupt it.”

Discover It, Then Blow It Up

The plan was to send rockets hundreds of miles up, higher than the Earth’s atmosphere, and then detonate nuclear weapons to see: a) If a bomb’s radiation would make it harder to see what was up there (like incoming Russian missiles!); b) If an explosion would do any damage to objects nearby; c) If the Van Allen belts would move a blast down the bands to an earthly target (Moscow! for example); and — most peculiar — d) if a man-made explosion might “alter” the natural shape of the belts.

The scientific basis for these proposals is not clear. Fleming is trying to figure out if Van Allen had any theoretical reason to suppose the military could use the Van Allen belts to attack a hostile nation. He supposes that at the height of the Cold War, the most pressing argument for a military experiment was, “if we don’t do it, the Russians will.” And, indeed, the Russians did test atomic bombs and hydrogen bombs in space.

In any case, says the science history professor, “this is the first occasion I’ve ever discovered where someone discovered something and immediately decided to blow it up.”

Code Name: Starfish Prime

http://redicecreations.com/ul_img/29182doomsday.jpgThe Americans launched their first atomic nuclear tests above the Earth’s atmosphere in 1958. Atom bombs had little effect on the magnetosphere, but the hydrogen bomb of July 9, 1962, did. Code-named “Starfish Prime” by the military, it literally created an artificial extension of the Van Allen belts that could be seen across the Pacific Ocean, from Hawaii to New Zealand.

In Honolulu, the explosions were front page news. “N-Blast Tonight May Be Dazzling: Good View Likely,” said the Honolulu Advertiser. Hotels held what they called “Rainbow Bomb Parties” on rooftops and verandas. When the bomb burst, people told of blackouts and strange electrical malfunctions, like garage doors opening and closing on their own. But the big show was in the sky.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2010/07/01/128170775/a-very-scary-light-show-exploding-h-bombs-in-space

In what sounds like the lunatic designs of a team of mad scientists, physicists are reportedly proposing a plan to wipe out the Van Allen radiation belts.

Nevermind that we’ve really only just begun to explore and understand the Van Allen belts – those pesky bands of radiation around our planet allegedly serve ’no purpose’, and are choking up Earth’s orbit with radiation that harms people or satellite equipment that travel through them. So, the physicists’ strategy is to use giant radio transmitters on the ground to beam very low frequency (VLF) waves into the belts to break them up and clear away those tenacious protons and electrons. …

Will the destruction of one of our planet’s features such as the Van Allen radiation belts cause unforeseen and catastrophic consequences? According to the global scientific community, “the easy answer is: probably not. ” …

Many satellites and other orbiting equipment have to shut off periodically, though, to avoid damage in the belts. That’s a problem when launching equipment is often the single most expensive element of a mission; science will not abide a field that mucks with its experiments, nor even one that makes them ship expensive shielding into space. If there would really be no downside to destroying the belts, then why not just do it, if we can? Notice that there are two “ifs” in that statement. The second is the easier of the two: Can we clear the belts?

A new proposition from scientists around the globe claims that very low frequency radio waves could be used to disburse Van Allen protons in the lower atmosphere, clearing several helpful new orbital distances for use by satellites and other equipment. Radio waves have problems getting through the highly charged ionosphere, which sits between us and the Van Allen regions, but scientists are hopeful that powerful emitters could mitigate this problem. Satellite-based VLF radio emitters have also been proposed, but such devices would take too much energy for an orbital platform.

One older idea for disbursing the belts was called HiVOLT, or High Voltage Orbiting Long Tether. This would be a system of five cables, each about 100 kilometers long, used to create a magnetic field that deflects the orbit of these particles. This could hypothetically change the orbital period of the particles so they either crash into the atmosphere or careen off into space — possibly thus disbursing the belts in as little as two months.
Read the full article at: geek.com

http://redicecreations.com/article.php?id=29183

Studying Earth's protective radiation belts

Two regions of radiation encircle the Earth. They’re called the Van Allen belts, and they are a pair of dynamic regions of trapped radiation, separated by a void and held in place by the Earth’s magnetic field. They protect the planet from the radiation of space and the effects of solar weather.

http://lightyears.blogs.cnn.com/2013/03/09/studying-earths-protective-radiation-belts/

The reptilians live safely underground and will not mind much when life on the surface is cooked by space radiation.

Posted in Earth, History, Physics, Space, Strange, Technology, War | Leave a Comment »

Roswell, NM selected as drone training area

Posted by Anonymous on March 2, 2014

20140301-232636.jpgPretty soon there will be something a little different flying about Roswell, and it doesn’t have anything to do with aliens.

An international aerospace company has picked Roswell as a drone training ground.

No, they’re not UFO’s, they’re UAV’s. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, in other words drones. And come summer unmanned drones will be flying the New Mexico sky. An international company, Strategic Aerospace, is setting up a drone pilot training center in Roswell.

The program will start with 30 air force academy graduates. They will eat, sleep, and fly drones for three months straight at the airport. The drones are battery operated and can’t stay in the air longer than 20 minutes.

“They never go over 400 feet, but they’re 80 knots. They’re pretty fast little things,” said Captain Bruce Oaster of Strategic Aerospace International. And believe it or not, they only weigh 35 pounds.

“It’s all lightweight plastic. It’s like the plastic airplanes you used to put together as a kid,” said Oaster.
Only these cost $100,000 apiece.
Pilots will practice take-offs and landings, controlling the flights from a remote control on the ground.
About three will be in the air at a time.
After pilots fly these for three months, they will earn certification.
“There’s countless jobs now coming on the market in agriculture, security, surveillance, law enforcement, the military, they fly pipelines,” said Oaster.

The company says the drones will only be flying over a limited area at the airport. The company assures they won’t be flying all over Roswell and definitely won’t be flying over homes …
P
http://www.infowars.com/roswell-nm-selected-as-drone-plane-training-center/

The links between the military and UFOs are numerous and curious.

Posted in Technology, UFOs, War | Leave a Comment »

Air Force aircraft returned from Vietnam is postwar source of Agent Orange contamination

Posted by Anonymous on February 26, 2014

From 1971-1982, Air Force reservists, who flew in 34 dioxin-contaminated aircraft used to spray Agent Orange and returned to the U.S. following discontinuation of the herbicide spraying operations in the Vietnam War, were exposed to greater levels of dioxin than previously acknowledged, according to a study published today in Environmental Research by senior author Jeanne Mager Stellman, PhD, professor emerita at the Mailman School of Public Health’s Department of Health Policy and Management.

“These findings are important because they describe a previously unrecognized source of exposure to dioxin that has health significance to those who engaged in the transport work using these aircraft,” according to Dr. Stellman and Peter A. Lurker, PhD, PE, CIH, an environmental engineer with many years of experience evaluating environmental exposures in the Air Force.

During the Vietnam War, in an operation known as “Operation Ranch Hand,” approximately 20 million gallons of herbicides, including around 10.5 million gallons of dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, were sprayed by 34 C-123 aircraft. These aircraft were subsequently returned to the U.S. and were used by Air Force reserve units between 1971 and 1982 for transport operations. After many years without monitoring, tests revealed the presence of dioxin also known as TCDD. All but three of the aircraft were smelted down in 2009.

The Air Force and Department of Veterans Affairs have previously denied benefits to these crew members. Current policies stipulate that “non-biologically available dried residues” of chemical herbicides and dioxin would not have led to meaningful exposures to flight crew and maintenance personnel, who are therefore ineligible for Agent Orange-related benefits or medical examinations and treatment. Researchers estimated dioxin body burden using modeling algorithms developed by the US Army and data derived from surface wipe samples collected from aircraft used in Operation Ranch Hand.

“… Aircraft occupants would have been exposed to airborne dioxin-contaminated dust as well as come into direct skin contact, and our models show that the level of exposure is likely to have exceeded several available exposure guidelines.”

via Air Force aircraft returned from Vietnam is postwar source of Agent Orange contamination.

The USA was not doing well fighting North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops in the jungle. Some in the US wanted to use nukes to clear the jungles, but instead they sprayed Agent Orange, a mixture of powerful and toxic plant killers to expose enemy positions. The military came to regret this because thousands of US vets were exposed and suffered from lifelong serious health issues which resulted in massive lawsuits.

http://xenophilius.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/d2f73-sorry.jpgAgent Orange was a powerful mixture of chemical defoliants used by U.S. military forces during the Vietnam War to eliminate forest cover for North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops, as well as crops that might be used to feed them. The U.S. program of defoliation, codenamed Operation Ranch Hand, sprayed more than 19 million gallons of herbicides over 4.5 million acres of land in Vietnam from 1961 to 1972. Agent Orange, which contained the chemical dioxin, was the most commonly used of the herbicide mixtures, and the most effective. It was later revealed to cause serious health issues–including tumors, birth defects, rashes, psychological symptoms and cancer–among returning U.S. servicemen and their families as well as among the Vietnamese population.

… According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Agent Orange contained “minute traces” of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), more commonly known as dioxin. Through studies done on laboratory animals, dioxin has been shown to be highly toxic even in minute doses; human exposure to the chemical could be associated with serious health issues such as muscular dysfunction, inflammation, birth defects, nervous system disorders and even the development of various cancers.

history.com/topics/vietnam-war/agent-orange

“The cause or causes of myeloma are unknown, but there is some evidence to support a number of theories of its origin, including viral, genetic, and exposure to toxic chemicals, the most notable being Agent Orange.” – UCSF

Posted in Crime, History, War | Leave a Comment »

NSA Can Hack and Spy on Any iPhone Any Time

Posted by Anonymous on February 22, 2014

Everything you do on your iPhone may be open to NSA snooping thanks to a covert software the agency can install without user’s knowledge. Apparently the app, called Dropout Jeep, can remotely send all of your text messages, contacts and voicemails to the NSA, and can activate your iPhone’s camera or mic for real time surveillance, too.

Security researcher says NSA can spy on your iPhone

Security researcher says NSA can spy on your iPhone
In a presentation at the 30th Chaos Communication Congress in Germany, security researcher Jacob Applebaum detailed the NSA’s iPhone spying capabilities. Along with being able to use Dropout Jeep to collect your conversations and contacts, the agency can use cell towers to find your location, and can remotely push new files to user’s iPhones.

The NSA documents Mr. Applebaum referenced say it has a perfect track record for installing Dropout Jeep on targeted iPhones, meaning they have been able to successfully install the software on every iPhone they want. Based on the agency’s success rate and the amount of data they’re able to collect, Mr. Applebaum questions Apple’s involvement.

He said in a presentation at the conference,

I don’t really believe that Apple didn’t help them. I can’t really prove it, but they [the NSA] literally claim that anytime they target an iOS device, that it will succeed for implantation. Either they have a huge collection of exploits that work against Apple products, meaning that they are hoarding information about critical systems that American companies produce and sabotaging them, or Apple sabotaged it themselves. Not sure which one it is. I’d like to believe that since Apple didn’t join the PRISM program until after Steve Jobs died, that maybe it’s just that they write shitty software.

PRISM is an NSA program to gain back door access to company servers so it can gather personal information and user activity without first gaining a court order. Apple has claimed it doesn’t participate in PRISM, and went so far as to say it hadn’t even heard of the program until it first appeared in the news in June 2013.

In a public statement Apple said, “We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order.”

Apple has since asked the NSA for better transparency on surveillance, and has said that text messages sent through iMessages are encrypted and that it can’t convert them back to readable text.

Apple has also said that it doesn’t collect dataabout user activities. If true, that would make a secret back door into the company’s servers less valuable, and would make something lie Dropout Jeep far more useful since it allows the NSA to gather whatever information it wants without directly involving Apple or its servers.

It’s a safe assumption that if the NSA has developed clandestine surveillance malware for the iPhone, it has done the same for other smartphone platforms, too. Android OS, Windows Mobile, and BlackBerry have all likely been targeted with similar malware, too.

A 2008 document that details Dropout Jeep said that in needed to be installed via “close access methods,” but that the agency was working on a way to remotely install the malware. Considering that was five years ago, it’s possible the NSA has moved on to remote installation, which could give the agency the ability to install its monitoring tools on any iPhone anywhere in the world at any time.

http://www.macobserver.com/tmo/article/nsa-can-hack-and-spy-on-any-iphone-any-time

Posted in human rights, Technology, War | Leave a Comment »

Industrial Band Bills DoJ For Using Its Music as a Torture Device

Posted by Anonymous on February 6, 2014

20140206-135549.jpg“What really bothers us is that they played our songs at an intolerable volume for hours on end” …

Industrial band Skinny Puppy is billing the U.S. Justice Department after finding out their tunes were used as a means of torturing detainees at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility in Cuba.

The band recently invoiced the DoJ for $666,000, requesting royalties be paid for unauthorized use of their music. “We thought we would invoice them properly, so we hit them with the evil numbers of $666,000,” keyboardist and founder CeVin Key told the Tampa Tribune. “We gave them a breakdown of the bill.”

Members of the Canadian experimental electro-industrial group say they’re not only aggravated their music was used without permission, but that they’re also against torture in general.

“We never supported those types of scenarios,” Key said. “Because we make unsettling music, we can see it being used in a weird way. But it doesn’t sit right with us.”

In an interview with the Phoenix New Times last month, Key said the news made him feel “not too good.” “We heard through a reliable grapevine that our music was being used in Guantanamo Bay prison camps to musically stun or torture people,” Key said.

“What really bothers us is that they played our songs at an intolerable volume for hours on end. The guards would ridicule the detainees when they defecated or urinated themselves. How can there be a torture camp there? It’s wrong. We’ve found out all about this over a year ago and it just ticked us off,” Key told the Tribune…

http://www.infowars.com/industrial-band-bills-doj-for-using-its-music-as-a-torture-device/

Posted in human rights, Music, Politics, War | Leave a Comment »

The Pentagon’s Mad Science Is Going Open Source

Posted by Anonymous on February 6, 2014

National security is often synonymous with secrecy. But when it comes to software development, the U.S. defense and intelligence establishment can be surprisingly open.
This week, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency — or DARPA, the research arm of the U.S. Defense department — published a list of all the open source computer science projects it has funded, including links to source code and academic papers that detail the code’s underlying concepts.

Anyone is free to not only peruse the source code and add to it, but actually use it to build their own software — and that includes foreign governments. The belief is that because anyone can contribute to these projects, the quality of the code will only improve, making the software more useful to everyone. It’s an approach that has paid off in spades among web companies from Google and Facebook to Twitter and Square, and the government has now realized that it too can benefit from the open source ethos.

The Softer Side of DARPA

DARPA is known for some pretty whacked out projects. Mind controlled exoskeletons. Space colonization. Turning pets into intelligence assets. That sort of thing. But it does have a more sober side. The agency funded the creation of the network that eventually became the internet, for example. And, more recently, it funded work on Mesos, the open source platform used by Twitter to scale applications across thousands of servers. It’s more of the latter that shows up on DARPA’s new site.

http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2014/02/darpa-open-source/

Posted in Technology, War | Leave a Comment »

 
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