Xenophilia (True Strange Stuff)

Blog of the real Xenophilius Lovegood, a slightly mad scientist

Archive for the ‘human rights’ Category

A map of human problems

Posted by Anonymous on June 21, 2014

20140621-135253-49973427.jpgI want something I can’t find on the net, something big and important. I want a visual interactive map of human problems and where we are along the various paths to solutions. I want everyone to be able to interact with it, add to it, vote on it!

We have all this information, so organize it! Who can help? Google? I want a globe where the continents are categories.

Here is a great planet maker: http://planetmaker.wthr.us/# I’d like something like terrestrial planet X.0 with randomly generated continents like this:
http://www-cs-students.stanford.edu/~amitp/game-programming/polygon-map-generation/demo.html

I want to zoom in on a problem to see the bleeding edge technology with details explained so anyone could understand it.

Update:

“At this year’s CeBIT exhibition, the team from Fraunhofer IGD / Fraunhofer IDM@NTU, Singapore, presents a new, exciting, X3DOM-based prototype for fast, intuitive exploration of information, which is entitled InfoLand. Information is presented on a multi-touch interface through a graphical representation, serving as an information or marketing tool for industry partners and collaborators, researchers, and students. Information is presented in the form of text, images, videos and 3D models, which can be accessed intuitively.”

Sounds like the InfoLand engine is close to being capable of what I’m imagining, but it doesn’t seem to be available for anyone to use.  What are the big categories?

Here’s a nice model as a start, but replace the Earth continents with the human problem continents, let them take different shapes as people add content and as old ideas erode.

http://workshop.chromeexperiments.com/projects/armsglobe/

Posted in Alt Energy, Do stuff, Earth, Education, Health, human rights, Money, Physics, Survival, Technology, War | 5 Comments »

LA Police: ALL Cars Under Criminal Investigation As Part Of License Plate Reader Surveillance

Posted by Anonymous on March 21, 2014

Police in LA have attempted to justify an Automatic License Plate Reader surveillance program by claiming that every single car in the city is part of a criminal investigation.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) recently acquired documents under the Freedom Of Information Act that show the Police Department and the Sheriff’s Department in LA argued that “All [license plate] data is investigatory.” The law enforcement departments also stated that the fact that the data will likely never be connected to any specific crime is insignificant.

The claims were made by police in briefs filed in response to a lawsuit brought by EFF and the ACLU seeking a week’s worth of the License Plate Reader data. The rights groups have taken issue with the surveillance program because the cameras used automatically and indiscriminately photograph all license plates, without any reasonable suspicion of wrongdoing.

EFF states that the response from law enforcement is “completely counter to our criminal justice system.”

“We assume law enforcement will not conduct an investigation unless there are some indicia of criminal activity.” the group states. “In fact, the Fourth Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution exactly to prevent law enforcement from conducting mass, suspicionless investigations under “general warrants” that targeted no specific person or place and never expired.”

This video from Vigilant Solutions, a private license plate tracking specialist company, shows how its system builds a comprehensive dossier on a person simply by capturing or inputting a license plate. Police have access to the databases, as do government agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security.

The License reader program, which records the time, date and location of registered vehicles (and therefore their drivers) operates “without an officer targeting a specific vehicle and without any level of criminal suspicion.” the group urges.

“Taken to an extreme, the agencies’ arguments would allow law enforcement to conduct around-the-clock surveillance on every aspect of our lives and store those records indefinitely on the off-chance they may aid in solving a crime at some previously undetermined date in the future.” EFF also warns.

While both law enforcement agencies do admit that there are substantial privacy concerns with the surveillance program, they have done so only as a way of justifying keeping secret all the data garnered from it, EFF argues.

A hearing on the case has been scheduled for next month.

Last month, The Washington Post reported that the Department of Homeland Security revealed via a Federal Business Opportunities solicitation that it was set to activate a national license plate tracking system that will be shared with law enforcement. When privacy advocates balked at the plan, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson immediately ordered its cancellation, according to The Post.

However, as noted this week by Dan Froomkin of The Intercept, it was not the overall program that was “cancelled”, it was only the solicitation for services, pertaining to data retention by a private vendor, that was scrapped.

“…the Post had gotten it all wrong.” Froomkin writes. “DHS wasn’t planning to create a national license-plate tracking database – because several already exist, owned by different private companies, and extensively used by law enforcement agencies including DHS for years.”

“And far from going away, the databases are growing at a furious pace due to rapidly improving technology and ample federal grant money for more cameras and more computers.” Froomkin adds.

“So rather than being the tale of an averted threat, the bulk license-plate tracking saga is actually a story about yet another previously unimaginable loss of privacy in the modern information age.” the writer concludes.

The following video from 8 years ago in 2006 shows that police have been using license plate surveillance for close to a decade.

There is already ample evidence proving that the license plate readers have previously been used by cops to target innocent Americans. In one case, police used the system to track political activists by having their vehicles added to a “hotlist” following attendance at protests. It is not hard to imagine how the system could be further used to target other thought criminals, as this ACLU video highlights:

Rights groups continue to warn that Automatic License Plate Reader programs are just another form of mass surveillance that have been quietly implemented in the US and in many other countries around the world, as we sleepwalk into a Panopticon prison society.

http://www.infowars.com/la-police-all-cars-under-criminal-investigation-as-part-of-license-plate-reader-surveillance/

Hey, lets all get our home address, birth date, sexual preference, religious affiliation, social security number, email addresses and phone numbers stamped on our foreheads too.

Posted in Crime, human rights, Politics | Leave a Comment »

Edward Snowden: Here’s how we take back the Internet (video | TED talk)

Posted by Anonymous on March 20, 2014

Appearing by telepresence robot, Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 about surveillance and Internet freedom. The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. “Your rights matter,” he says, “because you never know when you’re going to need them.” Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee. >
> http://www.ted.com/talks/edward_snowden_here_s_how_we_take_back_the_internet

Time for change. I find it interesting that Snowden can appear virtually at this event without being traced to his location by the NSA.

If you are in the camp that thinks Snowden is a traitor, be aware that the inventor of the Web disagrees with you.

Posted in human rights, Politics, Technology | 1 Comment »

Inventor of Web: A “Magna Carta” is needed

Posted by Anonymous on March 13, 2014

20140313-125412.jpgThe inventor of the world wide web believes an online “Magna Carta” is needed to protect and enshrine the independence of the medium he created and the rights of its users worldwide.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee told the Guardian the web had come under increasing attack from governments and corporate influence and that new rules were needed to protect the “open, neutral” system.

Speaking exactly 25 years after he wrote the first draft of the first proposal for what would become the world wide web, the computer scientist said: “We need a global constitution – a bill of rights.”

Berners-Lee’s Magna Carta plan is to be taken up as part of an initiative called “the web we want”, which calls on people to generate a digital bill of rights in each country – a statement of principles he hopes will be supported by public institutions, government officials and corporations.

“Unless we have an open, neutral internet we can rely on without worrying about what’s happening at the back door, we can’t have open government, good democracy, good healthcare, connected communities and diversity of culture. It’s not naive to think we can have that, but it is naive to think we can just sit back and get it.”

Berners-Lee has been an outspoken critic of the American and British spy agencies’ surveillance of citizens following the revelations by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. In the light of what has emerged, he said, people were looking for an overhaul of how the security services were managed.

His views also echo across the technology industry, where there is particular anger about the efforts by the NSA and Britain’s GCHQ to undermine encryption and security tools – something many cybersecurity experts say has been counterproductive and undermined everyone’s security.

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Principles of privacy, free speech and responsible anonymity would be explored in the Magna Carta scheme. “These issues have crept up on us,” Berners-Lee said. “Our rights are being infringed more and more on every side, and the danger is that we get used to it. So I want to use the 25th anniversary for us all to do that, to take the web back into our own hands and define the web we want for the next 25 years.”
The web constitution proposal should also examine the impact of copyright laws and the cultural-societal issues around the ethics of technology.

While regional regulation and cultural sensitivities would vary, Berners-Lee said he believed a shared document of principle could provide an international standard for the values of the open web.

He is optimistic that the “web we want” campaign can be mainstream, despite the apparent lack of awareness of public interest in the Snowden story.

“I wouldn’t say people in the UK are apathetic – I would say that they have greater trust in their government than other countries. They have the attitude that we voted for them, so let them get on and do it.

“But we need our lawyers and our politicians to understand programming, to understand what can be done with a computer. We also need to revisit a lot of legal structure, copyright law – the laws that put people in jail which have been largely set up to protect the movie producers … None of this has been set up to preserve the day to day discourse between individuals and the day to day democracy that we need to run the country,” he said.

Berners-Lee also spoke out strongly in favour of changing a key and controversial element of internet governance that would remove a small but symbolic piece of US control. The US has clung on to the Iana contract, which controls the dominant database of all domain names, but has faced increased pressure post-Snowden.

He said: “The removal of the explicit link to the US department of commerce is long overdue. The US can’t have a global place in the running of something which is so non-national. There is huge momentum towards that uncoupling but it is right that we keep a multi-stakeholder approach, and one where governments and companies are both kept at arm’s length.”

Berners-Lee also reiterated his concern that the web could be balkanised by countries or organisations carving up the digital space to work under their own rules, whether for censorship, regulation or commerce.

We all have to play a role in that future, he said, citing resistance to proposed copyright theft regulation.

He said: “The key thing is getting people to fight for the web and to see the harm that a fractured web would bring. Like any human system, the web needs policing and of course we need national laws, but we must not turn the network into a series of national silos.”

Berners-Lee also starred in the London 2012 Olympics, typing the words “this is for everyone” on a computer in the centre of the arena. He has stuck firmly to the principle of openness, inclusivity and democracy since he invented the web in 1989, choosing not to commercialise his model. Rejecting the idea that government and commercial control of such a powerful medium was inevitable, Berners-Lee said it would be impossible: “Not until they prise the keyboards from our cold, dead fingers.” …

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/mar/12/online-magna-carta-berners-lee-web

Sign up here https://webwewant.org and get to work on your own draft of the Web Bill of Rights, if you are so inclined.

Posted in human rights, Politics, Technology | 1 Comment »

Glasses will identify faces in crowd

Posted by Anonymous on March 12, 2014

20140312-142824.jpgA company has developed glasses that will give users not only an interactive, virtual 3-D display, but also the ability to spot individual faces among a crowd of people, something the company says will aid police in predicting and thwarting “future” crimes.

Capitalizing on the popularity of Apple’s soon-to-be-released techie eyewear, Atheer Labs has created a set of eyeglasses that give users “immersive 3-D,” surrounding them “with information wherever [they] turn and look..”

Similar to Google Glass, the Atheer One, as the glasses are dubbed, connects to the web, streams videos, and can act as a virtual calendar and organizer.

But in a recent interview with CBS Miami, the company’s founder, Allen Yang, touted the glasses as a new crime fighting tool that will give police eerie Minority Report-like future crime awareness…

Posted in Crime, human rights, Technology | Leave a Comment »

Police Dept. Covers Up Its NSA-Style, Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking with Fake Cell Towers

Posted by Anonymous on March 3, 2014

stingray-1-and-2-high-resDevice captures private cell data from innocent third-parties not involved in investigation …

Florida police used a cell phone tracking device at least 200 times without a warrant because they conspired with the device manufacturer to keep its use a secret, according to the ACLU.

The stingray cell tracking device works by mimicking a real cell phone tower, tricking phones into connecting to it.
Through a recent motion for public access, the ACLU determined that at least one Florida police department never told judges about its use of the cell phone tracking device, known as a “stingray,” because the department signed a non-disclosure agreement with the stingray’s manufacturer to keep its use from being publicly known.

The manufacturer, which the ACLU said was likely a Florida-based company, also retained ownership of its stingrays and only let the department borrow them, further aiding in its secrecy. The stingray, also called a “cell tower simulator,” determines the location of a targeted cell phone by impersonating a cell tower, which tricks the targeted phone – and non-targeted cell phones in the same range – into transmitting its precise location and phone records to the stingray.

“When in use, stingrays sweep up information about innocent people and criminal suspects alike,” Nathan Freed Wessler, an ACLU attorney, reported.

The ACLU learned about the department’s use of the stingray through an ongoing court case entitled Florida v. Thomas, in which police used the device to track a stolen cell phone to the suspect’s apartment.
After forcing their way inside the apartment, the police conducted a search of the residence, found the stolen phone and arrested the suspect.

Yet the police never obtained a warrant for the search or for its use of the stingray.

“This was apparently because they had signed a non-disclosure agreement with the company that gave them the device,” Wessler wrote. “The police seem to have interpreted the agreement to bar them even from revealing their use of stingrays to judges, who we usually rely on to provide oversight of police investigations.”

“Potentially unconstitutional government surveillance on this scale should not remain hidden from the public just because a private corporation desires secrecy,” he added. “And it certainly should not be concealed from judges.”

And, according to the ACLU, other police departments are also using stingrays secretly in the same fashion, joining an ever growing list of government entities infringing upon the Fourth Amendment.

Last week it was revealed that officials in Ypsilanti Township, Michigan began working with local police to place surveillance cameras in every neighborhood.

http://www.infowars.com/police-dept-covers-up-its-nsa-style-warrantless-cell-phone-tracking/

From USA Today:

” The system, typically installed in a vehicle so it can be moved into any neighborhood, tricks all nearby phones into connecting to it and feeding data to police. In some states, the devices are available to any local police department via state surveillance units. The federal government funds most of the purchases, via anti-terror grants. …

Many people aren’t aware that a smartphone is an adept location-tracking device. It’s constantly sending signals to nearby cell towers, even when it’s not being used. And wireless carriers store data about your device, from where it’s been to whom you’ve called and texted, some of it for years. …

The Stingray can grab some data from cellphones in real time and without going through the wireless service providers involved. …

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/12/08/cellphone-data-spying-nsa-police/3902809/

More:

The government has the ability to track cellphones using the portable device pictured above called the Stingray — it was recently revealed in a criminal case in Arizona, but the government doesn’t want anyone to know how it works. When the judge in the case asked for more information about the Stingray in order to determine if its use requires a search warrant, the government filed a memo basically arguing both ways: it said Stingray use generally doesn’t require a warrant, but concedes that one was required in this specific instance — a huge concession that could cost them the case, just so the Stingray’s design and functionality remain a secret.

Although the government’s lawyers are willing to tie themselves in knots trying to conceal the Stingray, we do have some information on how it works: experts told the WSJ that it mimics an actual cell tower pinging for a specific device, and the data can be used to triangulate a phone’s location. It can be concealed in the back of a van and measure the distance to any type of cell phone from multiple locations — circles drawn from each point will intersect within 100 meters of the phone’s location. Our FBI contact told us that tracking a cellphone normally requires a wireless provider’s cooperation, which could take weeks to obtain — the Stingray simplifies investigations because cell towers aren’t needed. We’ll see what happens — if it comes down to keeping the Stingray a secret or allowing law enforcement to track anyone they want without a warrant, we suppose we prefer the first.

http://mobile.theverge.com/2011/11/4/2535697/stingray-cellphone-tracker-government-wont-talk-about

According to Wired:

The government maintains that the stingrays don’t violate Fourth Amendment rights, since Americans don’t have a legitimate expectation of privacy for data sent from their mobile phones and other wireless devices to a cell tower.

http://teapartyeconomist.com/2011/12/19/stingray-towers-how-the-feds-intercept-cell-phone-calls/

… That’s pretty questionable. [From reading the ] 4th Amendment:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

It would seem that using such a device to locate a person in their house without a warrant seems to clearly violate the text of the Amendment. …

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110923/17251716080/details-emerging-stingray-technology-allowing-feds-to-locate-people-pretending-to-be-cell-towers.shtml

Posted in human rights, Politics, Technology | Leave a Comment »

Government watchlist puts computer parts orders on hold

Posted by Anonymous on February 25, 2014

20140226-140122.jpgA secret U.S. government watchlist is forcing companies to place orders on hold, according to an Australian named David Jones, whose name was flagged up as suspicious when he tried to purchase computer parts.

After Jones processed an “innocuous” order with Element 14, a large distributor of electronic and computer parts in Australia, he arrived at the company’s trade counter to pick up the goods only to be told that his order had been placed “on hold”.

After confirming that the hold was not due to the parts being restricted or suspicious in any way, Jones was told, “that it wasn’t the parts that had been flagged, it was my NAME that was flagged. And they said it was a US government watch list of some description.”

Staff told Jones that the system was designed to only flag up suspicious names, no matter how common, and they didn’t have to be linked to a specific address. The “hold” was cleared and Jones was given the parts within 5 minutes. The incident prompted Jones to recall that numerous previous orders had also been mysteriously placed on “hold” with no explanation.

Jones notes that the system is “yet another stupid procedure forced upon the world and corporations by the US government,” because all it takes to clear the “hold” instruction is for an Element 14 employee to press a button.

“An Australian subsidiary, owned by a UK parent company, listed on the UK stock exchange, has an ordering system that automatically matches generic names against some secret US Government watch list, and flags those orders and puts them on hold, for parts that are already stocked in Australia, are likely not made in the US, and likely have come from the main UK warehouse. Call me stupid, but something doesn’t seem right with that,” writes Jones.

The fact that the orders being put on hold relate to computer parts serves as a reminder of a recent revelations concerning how the NSA works with the FBI and CIA to intercept physical deliveries of computers and other hardware in order to take the laptop, “to a secret workshop where it could be discretely fitted with espionage software before being sent on its way.”

The operation and maintenance of U.S. government watchlists is notoriously ham-fisted. The no fly list is merely one component of a 500,000-750,000 strong government “watch list” that has ensnared people like the late former Senator Ted Kennedy, former presidential candidate John Anderson, and many others including a Vermont college student, a retired Presbyterian minister and an ACLU employee.

In 2012 it emerged that an 18-month old daughter of two New Jersey-born Americans of Middle Eastern descent was also added to the list.
The list has generated innumerable false positives which has led to widespread condemnation, especially given that the government has refused to amend its mistakes. A judge recently ruled that the no fly list was unconstitutional, but the federal government is fighting tooth and nail to keep it in place.

CNN journalist Drew Griffin was put on a TSA watchlist after he filed reports critical of the federal agency. Activists have also been arbitrarily placed on watchlists in order to prevent them from protesting at certain events.

Is it possible to build a decently fast computer these days where the hardware is not bugged?

Posted in human rights, Strange, Technology | Leave a Comment »

New Law: Prison for being gay in Uganda

Posted by Anonymous on February 24, 2014

20140224-132437.jpgLast week, it seemed like Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni was delaying taking action on the infamous anti-homosexuality bill, suggesting he was interested in hearing from more U.S. scientists about the nature of homosexuality. On Monday, though, he signed the bill into law.
The law, often referred to as the “Kill the Gays” bill because previous versions of it included the death penalty, allows for a lifetime jail sentence for people found guilty of being gay. Some more recent versions of the bill have still included reference to a different law that did allow for the death penalty. First-time offenders can be punished with 14 years in jail. Those who promote LGBT issues would also be in violation of the law, as would anybody who officiates a same-sex marriage.
Museveni explained that he signed the bill because he was concerned that gay people were “recruiting normal people” into homosexuality, using them as prostitutes, and exhibiting themselves. His statement suggests he was fully convinced by the distorted report from Ugandan scientists submitted suggesting that homosexuality as either an “open choice” or something caused by “indoctrination.” He seemed to suggest that any form of public display of affection is inappropriate, but all the more reason that gay people who hold hands or kiss in public should be punished if they cannot be rehabilitated:
Since nurture is the main cause of homosexuality, then society can do something about it to discourage the trends. That is why I have agreed to sign the Bill. [...]

Since my original thesis that there may be people who are born homosexual has been disproved by science, then the homosexuals have lost the argument in Uganda. They should rehabilitate themselves and society should assist them to do so.
President Obama condemned Museveni’s decision to sign the bill last week, noting that it will “complicate our valued relationship with Uganda.” On Twitter, Ofwono Opondo, an official spokesperson for the Ugandan government, accused Obama of being arrogant, chiding him for criticizing Uganda’s law more than he has Arizona’s bill allowing religious discrimination against the LGBT community. “Propaganda for blackmail against anti-gay law by European & US media,” he wrote, “won’t derail Pres Museveni signing.”…

http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2014/02/24/3321761/ugandan-president-signs-anti-homosexuality-law/

Great news, that sexual preference is a choice. That means you can choose to be attracted to anything, like giant squid, waffle irons, the act of paying your taxes… Think of the possibilities! A clear explanation of how to genuinely make this change must be presented before a law that prohibits not doing so. Show the world that it is possible, Museveni, by changing your preference from human women to avocados. No faking it, either. I’m not gay, but your law is beyond stupid.

Posted in human rights, Mind, Politics | Leave a Comment »

NSA Can Hack and Spy on Any iPhone Any Time

Posted by Anonymous on February 22, 2014

Everything you do on your iPhone may be open to NSA snooping thanks to a covert software the agency can install without user’s knowledge. Apparently the app, called Dropout Jeep, can remotely send all of your text messages, contacts and voicemails to the NSA, and can activate your iPhone’s camera or mic for real time surveillance, too.

Security researcher says NSA can spy on your iPhone

Security researcher says NSA can spy on your iPhone
In a presentation at the 30th Chaos Communication Congress in Germany, security researcher Jacob Applebaum detailed the NSA’s iPhone spying capabilities. Along with being able to use Dropout Jeep to collect your conversations and contacts, the agency can use cell towers to find your location, and can remotely push new files to user’s iPhones.

The NSA documents Mr. Applebaum referenced say it has a perfect track record for installing Dropout Jeep on targeted iPhones, meaning they have been able to successfully install the software on every iPhone they want. Based on the agency’s success rate and the amount of data they’re able to collect, Mr. Applebaum questions Apple’s involvement.

He said in a presentation at the conference,

I don’t really believe that Apple didn’t help them. I can’t really prove it, but they [the NSA] literally claim that anytime they target an iOS device, that it will succeed for implantation. Either they have a huge collection of exploits that work against Apple products, meaning that they are hoarding information about critical systems that American companies produce and sabotaging them, or Apple sabotaged it themselves. Not sure which one it is. I’d like to believe that since Apple didn’t join the PRISM program until after Steve Jobs died, that maybe it’s just that they write shitty software.

PRISM is an NSA program to gain back door access to company servers so it can gather personal information and user activity without first gaining a court order. Apple has claimed it doesn’t participate in PRISM, and went so far as to say it hadn’t even heard of the program until it first appeared in the news in June 2013.

In a public statement Apple said, “We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order.”

Apple has since asked the NSA for better transparency on surveillance, and has said that text messages sent through iMessages are encrypted and that it can’t convert them back to readable text.

Apple has also said that it doesn’t collect dataabout user activities. If true, that would make a secret back door into the company’s servers less valuable, and would make something lie Dropout Jeep far more useful since it allows the NSA to gather whatever information it wants without directly involving Apple or its servers.

It’s a safe assumption that if the NSA has developed clandestine surveillance malware for the iPhone, it has done the same for other smartphone platforms, too. Android OS, Windows Mobile, and BlackBerry have all likely been targeted with similar malware, too.

A 2008 document that details Dropout Jeep said that in needed to be installed via “close access methods,” but that the agency was working on a way to remotely install the malware. Considering that was five years ago, it’s possible the NSA has moved on to remote installation, which could give the agency the ability to install its monitoring tools on any iPhone anywhere in the world at any time.

http://www.macobserver.com/tmo/article/nsa-can-hack-and-spy-on-any-iphone-any-time

Posted in human rights, Technology, War | Leave a Comment »

Venezuela, here is my voice.

Posted by Anonymous on February 22, 2014

Anonymous:

I don’t usually reblog other people’s WordPress posts, but this one caught my attention. We should all know and care about human rights abuses around the world.

Originally posted on bvgonzal:

A very close SU friend from Venezuela told me one of her friends from home was murdered today. I have been preparing for some days to write this post, and I have asked many fellow SU students if they know about the situation in Venezuela and most people have no idea. This gave me even more motivation, so I would like to share with you the terrible reality that is going on in Venezuela.

Venezuela has been facing economic, social and security problems, among others, caused by the corrupt Venezuelan government. More than 90% of the murders in Venezuela go unpunished. On February 12, Venezuela’s national youth day, students were tired of the injustice and corruption in their country caused by the government, so they started a peaceful riot for their rights. These students were unarmed; they carried flags, cameras, signs and flowers. The police force reacted aggressively and attacked…

View original 204 more words

Posted in human rights | Leave a Comment »

 
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